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MUTEMATH

Kickstand Productions Proudly Presents

MUTEMATH

Civil Twilight

Fri, September 21, 2012

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Castle Theatre

Bloomington, IL

$22.00 - $24.00

This event is all ages

SPECIAL OFFER: Every ticket sold between July 20-27 will include a free digital download of MuteMath’s live show from the famous 9:30 Club in Washington, DC, recorded on March 10, 2012. An email containing a url and redemption code will be sent on Tuesday, July 31. Purchasers will need to redeem this code in order to receive the live album.

MUTEMATH
MUTEMATH
Primarily written and recorded at singer/keyboardist's Paul Meany's New Orleans, Louisiana home, MUTEMATH's new album Odd Soul is the band's third studio release and their first self-produced effort. After the departure of longtime guitarist Greg Hill, Meany, bassist Roy Mitchell-Cárdenas and drummer Darren King were staring at a crossroad as they pondered how to move forward. "As we began to work on songs, we quickly realized that having fewer people in the creative process was better. Roy's a great guitar player, and we all started feeding off of this new inspiration for the kind of record we could make… all we needed was to be left alone until we got there."

There's a spontaneity and spark to all of the songs on Odd Soul that's unmistakable, something Meany credits to the fact of starting the recording process right after working on their 2010 DVD Armistice Live. "We really wanted to just cut to the chase on this album and compose music that would work for us on stage. We were craving more high-spirited music for this album so any song idea that came close to depressing got nixed," he continues. "We're not good at being dark so we wanted to see how far we could go into creating something glaringly bright."

That uplifting nature permeates all thirteen tracks on Odd Soul, however each song has its own distinct musical feel. From the bombastic Zeppelin-esque groove of "Allies" to the syncopated soul of "Blood Pressure" and electro-ambience of the ballad "In No Time," Odd Soul showcases how much the band has grown over the past few years, most notably when it comes to Meany's vocals. "I've certainly never pushed my voice as hard as I did on this record," he adds, "We all pushed ourselves to the brink of our ability on this record… we recorded it as if this would be the last record we'd ever make."

Despite the fact that many of the songs on Odd Soul—such as the garage-inflected title track—will inevitably make bodies move, the album simultaneously addresses some deeper themes hovering around all of the head nodding. "The lyrical idea of this record is loosely based on our upbringing in what I guess you could call eccentric Christianity," Meany explains, adding that this is also the first album where Meany and King fully collaborated on lyrics. "We wanted to address a lot of the stories we've gathered over the years in what is an admittedly odd culture," he continues. "And not only that, it's our culture, and we know it well… I think writing this record certainly gave us a new appreciation for it, and it gave us a chance to be much more up front about ourselves."

"I learned through these years to treasure my hyper-literal, overly-ambitious, loose wire adolescent adventures in attempting to out-Jesus even Jesus," King adds. "We wanted to celebrate, up front and center, what we used to think was best kept in the shadows, our weird religious roots. The challenge we took on with this record was to become more lyrically honest, vulnerable, and specific than before, with music that was as exhilarating as some of the most charged up shows we had done up to that point. I am proud to have been raised in an environment that valued intensity, that felt it was important to have something to get all worked up over, that allowed music to be spontaneous and loud and innocent (aka youthful). So this record is the start of us telling the stories that surrounded all of that."

Artistically, MUTEMATH has made a rock album that is unmistakably and inherently their own. Rooted in New Orleans rhythm and blues, fusing elements from psychedelia to traditional gospel to modern electronica, Odd Soul is constructed to live up to its title. "I think the title describes this record in every context." Meany summarizes, "It's who we are, where we've been, and what we incidentally sound like when set to music."
Civil Twilight
Civil Twilight
Civil Twilight is a mystifying blend of atmospheric sounds with swirling guitars and hazy story¬telling centered on the struggles and triumphs of human existence. Three parts South Africa and one part Nashville, Steven McKellar, his brother Andrew, Richard Wouters and Kevin Dailey combine power and grace to provide a soundtrack for everything from the cracking of a heart to a walk around the block. Their sophomore release, Holy Weather is a remarkable journey through a dense forest of emotion and has been heralded as some of the best music to come out in 2012.

Civil Twilight provides a safe haven in which to seek refuge. Steven’s vocals come forth in an eerie falsetto that can only be described as a cross-pollination of Jeff Buckley and Thom Yorke. Richard’s drums are pounding reminders that the drummer always steers the ship along its voyage, while Andrew’s guitars alongside the newest addition of Kevin on keyboards and vocal harmonies cre¬ate intense musical waves proving that a rising tide truly does lift all boats. Civil Twilight’s lush soundscape is haunting, yet soothing at the same time.

Steven, Andrew and Richard grew up in Cape Town, South Africa, best friends since childhood. Steven and Andrew’s mother, a classical pianist, played opera throughout the home. It was after the three started listening to grunge music that Civil Twilight, a fierce combination of both operatic and alternative elements, was born. While their South African roots provided much inspiration, the three friends grew restless and relocated to Los Angeles. Their self-titled debut was recorded in South Carolina after which Steven, Andrew and Richard settled in Nashville. Many years later, home has become a little town called Nashville, where they met Kevin Dailey and were so taken by his talent and artistic nature that they invited him to join Civil Twilight. Holy Weather was written in part to explore the nature and culture of the people of Nashville. The writing process shifted on Holy Weather from Civil Twilight’s first release. When Steven start¬ed writing songs for their follow-up album, he used the most powerful tool at his disposal: postal¬gia. “When you’re constantly in motion, you can’t sit down and spend hours looking at something; you don’t have time to really absorb what you’re going through so you absorb subconsciously and write about it later as you reflect on it. There’s a difference between actually being in the moment, writing about it as it affects you, than when it’s flashing through your memory later on.” This new approach to songwriting proved to be more challenging. However, all four members agreed that they wanted to craft an album that was a real test to play, not in terms of technique but in terms of exploring a longing that they hadn’t been able to discover on the previous record.

Civil Twilight spent the better part of the last year on tour playing the likes of Bonnaroo and Voo¬too Fest, opening for acts like Smashing Pumpkins and Florence & The Machine, and headlining their own shows across the country. This year, they have been touring relentlessly, making festivals tops with bands like The Dave Matthews Band, Flaming Lips, Red Hot Chili Peppers and The Afghan Whigs. This fall Civil Twilight will embark on a nationwide tour with Mutemath. Civil Twilight is exceptional in their rare gift of tangibility and fragility. Their songs are an intro¬cate maze of story and harmony. It is music for a world that is not quite dark and not quite light, much like that moment before the sun sets when we stop and take a breath.
Venue Information:
The Castle Theatre
209 E. Washington St.
Bloomington, IL, 61701
http://www.thecastletheatre.com/